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Everything You Need To Know About Commercial Glazing

What is Commercial Glazing?

You may not realise but there are a wide variety of commercial glazing examples surrounding you in civil and commercial areas. A couple of common examples include the drive-thru window at your local McDonalds or a shopfront window.

Sydney Commercial glazing is an important factor in the functionality and design of these windows. To simply explain, commercial glazing is glazing that is used on commercial buildings and almost every commercial building needs it! In contrast residential glazing includes glazing on residential properties like window panes and doors on your home.

When Sydney glass is installed in residential or commercial markets the needs and priorities are vastly different. As stated, most residential buildings use glass for their windows, doors, sunrooms and skylights. However, in commercial buildings glass is commonly used in large proportions to fill vacant wall space. As the scale and the size of a majority of commercial properties are much bigger than residential properties, a special commercial glazing process is required. The type and quantity of glass required will be different as will the installation and the glazing procedure.

Commercial projects require glazers that have had in depth training, tools, materials and safety equipment. If there is a curtain wall that needs to be installed scaffolding or other safety measures may have to be used to complete the installation in a safe manner.

The Applications Of Commercial Glazing

Commercial glazing Sydney is not just used outdoors, but is also used indoors and there are a wide variety of applications that you may not expect. Commercial glazing can be installed to improve the aesthetics and functionality of the building, or, a combination of both!

Commercial glass interior applications most commonly include office venues made with glass walls, doors and interior foyers. Another interior application with commercial structures includes the use of custom glass and mirrors. Commercial glass exterior applications most commonly involve storefronts, curtainwall systems, display windows. These provide the entire exterior of the commercial building to have an extravagant finish. Curtainwall glass does not carry the the weight of the roof and therefor needs specific engineering to be correctly designed and installed for the commercial structure.

Here is a more extensive list of common Sydney interior and exterior applications.

Commercial Glazing Interior Applications:

– Custom Mirrors
– Custom Glass
– Furniture
– Railings
– Shelving
– Door Closures
– Flooring
– Skylights
– Acoustic Glass
– Glass Floors

Commercial Glazing Exterior Applications:

– Storefront Glass
– Windows
– Security Glass
– Curtain Glass
– Security Glass
– Entrance Door
– Solar Panels
– Teller Windows
– Atriums

The Benefits Of Commercial Glazing

Commercial glazing has a variety of benefits for commercial buildings. Most commercial buildings are installed with walls and windows made out of glass that has particular solar glazing to decrease solar heat gain. This specific type of glazing is great for limited energy spending. Double and triple glazing is also beneficial in commercial buildings. Double and Triple glazing is less common but is starting to gain traction in residential buildings. Commercial glazing is beneficial as it provides excellent thermal performance as well as enhanced acoustics.

Commercial glazing is a great option to create natural light in areas where many people are occupying for long periods of times such as office spaces. The thermal insulation that this glazing offers is also beneficial for these areas. Buildings that have substantial insulation through commercial Sydney glazing have reduced cooling costs during the summer months and reduced heating costs during the winter months. This generally is not cost effective for residential buildings, however, it can be great to reduce the maintenance and operation costs for office buildings, medical centres or supermarkets.

Materials for Commercial Glazing

Glass is obviously the first material that comes to mind when thinking of glazing. When glass is used for glazing, it is quite often double or triple glazed to provided additional benefits like thermal performance and acoustic insulating properties. Double glazing includes the process of using two glass window panes (or three for triple glazing), that are separated by space to reduce the heat transfer.

Despite this, there has recently been a rise in plastic sheeting. Generally, commercial glazing industry experts use different types of acrylic and polycarbonate setting for commercial glazing applications. Choosing plastic sheeting for glazing applications provides improved performance, cost and energy savings. There are different plastic types and they provide various benefits.

The Benefits of Acrylic Plexiglass for Commercial Glazing

This Acrylic sheeting can be up to 50 times stronger than glass and is beneficially half the weight. This therefore makes installation a lot easier and improves performance overall. Simply put, the lighter the materials weighs, the easier it is to handle, allows for cheaper shipping and handling costs. The acrylic sheets are naturally UV stable, allowing for a perfect optical view that can be used as the best substitute for regular glass. This clear acrylic sheeting is ideal for commercial Sydney glazing. Acrylic AR2 scratch-resitant sheeting is also a great modified alternative for areas that have high-traffic.

The Benefits of Polycarbonate Sheets for Commercial Glazing

Polycarbonate is rapidly starting to be the most popular option for commercial glazing as it has exceptional impact resistance and is shatter resistant. It is even stronger than acrylic sheeting, and is almost 100 times stronger than glass. Similarly to acyclic sheeting, it is also extremely light weight. However, unlike acrylic sheeting, these polycarbonate sheets are not naturally UV stable. Despite this, you can add an extra layer of protection to one side of the sheeting to provide extended longevity when the sheet is exposed to the sun. As polycarbonate plastic is becoming a popular choice for commercial Sydney glazing due to its strength, there are a variety of modified polycarbonate sheets that are used in glazing such as:
– Bullet-Resistant Polycarbonate
– Polycarbonate AR2
– Trupoly SL Polycarbonate
– Multiwall Polycarbonate

About Complete Glass – 

Complete Glass has been delivering premium glazing solutions to Sydney for over 10+ years! Starting out in Western Sydney, we quickly grew and begun servicing the inner West and then central Sydney. Our commitment to quality finishes, professional craftsmanship and friendly service has seen our business grow rapidly in the past five years. We would love to hear from you and help with any glazing project you may have in mind. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via 1300 147 247 or alternatively you can email us via our contact form >

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What Type Of Glazing Is Best For My Window Wall

At Complete Glass we are glazing experts.

With a variety of glazing types on the market and we know it can be confusing to know which is right for your project. Glazing comes in various thicknesses, energy performance enhancements, colour tints and decorative films we are here to guide you to the correct solution for your project.

In this post we will be discussing size considerations for window wall glazing, the most appropriate glazing for thermal performance and safety, glass options for decorative and privacy applications and unique glass types with technological advancements.

The Size Of Your Windows Matter!

In Sydney, the most noticeable attribute of window walls is their size and span. Glass can now be fabricated to full story heights and wall to wall expanses to form very large openings.

The size of the individual window units is only retrained by the fabrication capacity of the glass manufacturer. The rise in technology and fabrication ability have pushed the limits on the size of glass.

You may have some some modern houses showcasing full floor to ceiling panels of glass which were once though inconceivable. Although these windows have a great visual appeal, they also come at a higher cost. Simply put, the larger the unit of glass, the higher the price.

It is recommended by most Sydney window manufacturers to stay below 4.6m2 of glass per unit. Anything more than this and the costs will start to rise. It is also important to note that very large pieces of glass could limit the number of glass fabricators that can make the piece of glass itself.

It’s important to note that big operable windows or doors are not only limited by the glass fabrication company but also the window and door hardware. The capacity of hardware will be vital to the weight and proportion of the unit getting bigger and heavier.

Great the Layers = Greater the Efficiency

It is common that most modern windows are made up of double or triple-paned units. Windows that are multi-paned (2-4 layers of glass) have either an air or gas-filled layer between each individual sheet. This filler layer adds extra insulation and enhances the thermal performance of the entire glass panel. These insulated glazing units are sometimes called IGUs for short.

It is common for most window wall manufacturers to use double paned IGU’s for their standard window assembly. Most single paned windows aren’t energy efficient enough. If you are concerned with the energy loads you should consider triple-paned windows or choosing higher performing glass panels as we will describe below.

What Glass Is Best For Thermal Protection?

As windows do no have a great thermal performance in comparison to solid walls, most glass manufacturers are working towards technological advancements to make windows more sustainable and energy efficient. Most windows companies now offer a wide range of windows that are energy efficient.

Below are the most common glazing options to improve thermal performance:

Low-Emissivity (Low-E) Glass – This is glass that has a special invisible coating to reflect and block out heat, all while minimising UV rays from passing through the glass.

Reflective Glass – This is glass that has been treated with a metallic coating to help reflect heat and radiation rather than absorbing it. Reflective glass reduces heat gain and visible light transmission. There are two methods that are used to do so, colour tints and reflective films.

Colour tinted glass – This is glass with small colour additions such as bronze, green, blue or grey. It can help to regulate solar heat gain by absorbing the heat. The colour is homogenous throughout the expense of glass and will not affect the basic properties of the glass itself except for solar energy transmission.

Reflective films – This involves a reflected film that is applied to one side of the glass to decrease solar gain. This in turn reflects more light and often has a mirror effect.

Of these two options it is most common for Low-E glass to be used on window wall project and manufacturers usually provide this as a standard for a range of window systems to help reach the energy requirements of today’s codes. Reflective glass is generally used in the commercial sector for storefront systems and curtain walls.

Safety Glazing Options For Window Walls

When designing a Sydney window wall system you must also consider its safety. As we know, glass is sharp when it is broken, therefore there are ways to minimise hazards associated with glass breakage, using tempered and laminated glass options.

Tempered Glass – This is a type of safety glass that is stronger both physically and thermally to normal glass. When this type of glass is broken it shatters into granular pieces instead of splintering into jagged shards of glass. The tempering process makes the outer surfaces into compression and the inner surfaces but tension. These granular pieces are far less likely to cause injury.

Laminated Glass – This safety glass holds itself together when it is broken or shattered. It has a special interlayer that sticks between the glass layers.

Decorative & Other Types Of Unique Glass

In addition to temperature regulating and safety options for window glazing, there are also a variety of decorative Sydney window options for privacy and other features. These are not standard or traditional window wall systems so you may need to request and enquire.

Some include:

Translucent Glass – This is achieved with sandblasting, acid etching or applying a specific film to make the glass less transparent for privacy or decorative reasons.

Self-Cleaning Glass – This is glass that has a chemical coating that reacts with the daylight to minimise and break down organic dirt. It cleans itself via both daylight and rain.

Bird-Friendly Glass – This glass is patterned with a UV reflective coating. It is visible to birds but not to the human eye therefore it remains translucent to us.

Electrochromic Privacy Glass – This glass can turn opaque or translucent with the flick of a switch (electrodes are installed to the inside of the glass and when an electric current runs through it, the ions react and move to reflect light). It is most commonly used for privacy reasons.

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About Complete Glass – 

Complete Glass has been delivering premium glazing solutions to Sydney for over 10+ years! Starting out in Western Sydney, we quickly grew and begun servicing the inner West and then central Sydney. Our commitment to quality finishes, professional craftsmanship and friendly service has seen our business grow rapidly in the past five years. We would love to hear from you and help with any glazing project you may have in mind. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via 1300 147 247 or alternatively you can email us via our contact form >

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What Is Glazing And Why Is It Important?

Complete Glass are Sydney’s expert Glaziers. We’ve been servicing Sydney for over 10+ years with fast, efficient, and affordable glassing solutions.

If you live in Sydney and need to replace your glass windows, it is important to be aware of what glazing is. Primarily people believe that this is something you do to your windows in order to make them more energy efficient.

Windows comes in all different styles and types, but Glazing actually refers to the glass itself that is installed within the frame. This is usually with single or dual pane sheets.

If you need energy efficient windows, at Complete Glass we can help deliver and install the best glass sheets at the most competitve prices. If you want to ensure your home is sealed up completely, you can even opt to install a triple glaze that will fit in between the two panes.

Does Complete Glass Recommend Glazing Your Windows?

One of the best things you can to do maximize the energy efficiency of your home is glazing the property windows. Aside from doors, poorly functioning windows are usually the biggest culprits for heat loss. If you have an older home or if you’ve only recently moved into a new property your windows might need to be reglazed. This could be for a wide range of factors such as, if the glass has been damaged or cracked in any way, you can be sure that something will need to be done sooner or later. If you have a cracked or damaged glass window it is always better to fix the problem as quickly as possible. This is because glass can be dangerous and you do not want it to break and shatter and potentially cause anymore harm. If the glass is cracked or warped, this is a sure sign that you should contact Complete Glass to come and inspect the window and see if a window replacement or reglazing will need to be performed.

To be clear, the majority of reglazing jobs are actually performed on glass windows that have reached a point of decay rather than windows that are damaged. Glass Windows do have an expiration date and when that time comes you should contact Complete Glass to make sure you get them reglazed properly.

So What Is Involved In A Reglaze By Complete Glass?

Well a reglaze can mean a few different things. It does not only mean installing ones that have multiple panes of glass. Most glass can be tinted as well, which entails having a coat of clear film present to block out light and even further save on energy costs.

Depending on what Sydney Glazing work needs to be performed you will probably want to hire a professional glazier like Complete Glass to the job for you. As glazing experts we know that many older homes have windows that simply cannot be replaced. Homeowners will often want to preserve the character and style of the era, which can pose an issue when the glass itself needs to be reglazed. You can either have someone come to the job at your home, or you can send your windows in to a firm that specializes in reglazing services.

About Complete Glass – 

Complete Glass has been delivering premium glazing solutions to Sydney for over 10+ years! Starting out in Western Sydney, we quickly grew and begun servicing the inner West and then central Sydney. Our commitment to quality finishes, professional craftsmanship and friendly service has seen our business grow rapidly in the past five years. We would love to hear from you and help with any glazing project you may have in mind. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via 1300 147 247 or alternatively you can email us via our contact form >

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Types of Window Glass: What’s Best for Your Home?

Complete Glass are Sydney’s expert Glaziers. We’ve been servicing Sydney for over 10+ years with fast, efficient, and affordable glassing solutions.

If you’re interested in new glass windows for your home or replacing your existing glass windows, you naturally want to do your research and make sure you’re picking the right kind.

While you don’t need to be an expert, it is helpful to understand common terminology and the various types that are available. So without further ado below is a detailed list on the various types of window glass, so you can choose what’s best for your home or project.

Float Glass – Float glass is named for the process of forming molten glass into large, flat panels. During the process, molten glass is floated on molten tin, producing the smoothest possible large, thin glass panel. This is a basic sheet of glass before it is cut, treated, upgraded and set into a frame – a starting material for your window. This is low-cost, colourless glass as the starting point for what will become quality windows, glass doors and panels.

Safety Laminated Glass – Laminated glass is an extra-strong, security-enhanced glass created by fusing at least two panes around an inner layer of PVB (polyvinyl butyral). This process uses a high heat and pressure fusion process to create a super-strong panel.

If you need glass to stay put in the frame if it’s broken, for safety or security reasons, this would be one of your best choices. After all, it’s laminated glass technology that you’ll find in your vehicle’s windshield: ensuring that an object colliding with the glass does not strike the occupant and spray glass shards inside.

Obscured Glass – Obscured glass is any type of glass which allows light to come in, but can’t be clearly seen through. Obscured glass patterns may be frosted, etched, coated or otherwise designed so that you can’t look through it and see more than vague shadows of what’s behind. That’s why this is the most popular type of glass for bathroom windows, shower doors and entry door areas.

While there’s some debate on whether it truly affords enough privacy for bathrooms and showers or not, obscured glass is usually worth it to anyone who wants more natural light indoors.

Annealed Glass – Annealing is the slow, meticulous and controlled process of cooling a panel of float glass. The purpose of this process is to strengthen the glass by reducing the stress caused to it by quick cooling.

This is usually the next step for float glass, and now further upgrades can be done. Annealed glass is not the ideal choice for windows, as it’ll leave shards and large, sharp pieces if it is broken.

Tinted Glass – Tinted glass is any kind of glass which has coloring added. This can be done for several reasons, including design aesthetic, privacy and reducing heat from sunlight. Tinted glass can also be a form of protection against harmful UV rays.

You usually see tinted glass on vehicles, skylights and decorative panels, but you can also use it for external windows to bump up your privacy factor a little bit.

Tempered Glass – Tempered glass is annealed glass – only with quadrupled strength. Tempered glass can’t be cut, so the tempering process takes place only after the annealed glass is cut and finished in the desired size. The glass is heated to above 1200 degrees and then quickly cooled. To make heat-soaked tempered glass, the panes are baked at 550 degrees.

If the glass is unstable, it’ll break. This method tests the glass before it’s used in any real-life applications. You probably have tempered safety glass in your car, so that you can break them out in case of an emergency.

Insulated Glass – Insulated glass windows come in a unit that is optimized for energy efficiency. They may be two or three panes of glass, with argon in the spaces between the panes. The glass panes in an insulated unit are typically laminated or tempered security glass.

An insulated glass window unit also has a desiccant component, ensuring that condensation won’t form in between the panes where you can’t wipe it off. Insulated glass windows are a great choice for exterior glass that’ll help you keep your heating and cooling costs down. Not all insulated glass units are created equally, so be sure to compare your options for the best energy efficiency ratings.

Mirrored Glass – To create mirrored glass, a panel is given a metal coating on one side. This coating is sealed with an extra protective sealant, creating a mirror effect. You usually find mirrored glass being used in a decorative capacity, such as on walls, furniture and doors. Mirrored glass is pretty, but it’s not usually used for exterior windows.

Low-E Glass – Low emissivity glass is specially coated to reflect thermal radiation. The low-e coating keeps out infrared rays, while light still filters through. Why is this so beneficial for homes? During the summer, heat is directed away from your house, and in the winter, your indoor heat is reflected back in the house and won’t escape through the windows.

This translates to lower heating and cooling costs. Low-e glass can be a pricey investment, but the savings in the long run can make it worth it. Some types of low-e coatings cause tinting, so be sure to check out some samples in person to make sure you’re okay with how the glass will look installed in your home.

Wired Glass – Wire glass isn’t necessarily considered a security glass, but it’s a fire-resistant glass. That’s why it’s most commonly used in schools, hospitals, and other commercial buildings. The grid of wires built into the panes will actually hold the glass in the frame if it shatters under high heat – such as a building fire.

It can also withstand a blast from a firefighter’s hose without blowing shards out everywhere. While wired glass works great for many commercial applications, you don’t often see it used in residential home design.

Heat Strengthened Glass – To make annealed glass panels twice as tough, it’s reheated above 1200 and then cooled. It’s not cooled quite as quickly as tempered glass, so it’s not as strong. Heat strengthened glass is tougher than lower grades of glass, but it can still shatter and break into sharp pieces. It’s not often used for exterior windows until it has also been laminated.

About Complete Glass – 

Complete Glass has been delivering premium glazing solutions to Sydney for over 10+ years! Starting out in Western Sydney, we quickly grew and begun servicing the inner West and then central Sydney. Our commitment to quality finishes, professional craftsmanship and friendly service has seen our business grow rapidly in the past five years. We would love to hear from you and help with any glazing project you may have in mind. Please do not hesitate to get in touch with us via 1300 147 247 or alternatively you can email us via our contact form >